Awesome Words We Need to Use More Often

We need to start using these “awesome words” more often…

 

For anyone who does not know Adlandpro, we are without a doubt one of the best known group of people from all over the globe. Some of our members are from Russia, Bulgaria, Australia, USA, Canada and other countries and one of the most wonderful things about this social community ( apart from laughing at frogs with false teeth) and other such goings on is our ability to communicate with each other and at times the Google Translate box is used frequently.

While this community does have a serious side ( people talking about business, blogging and other important social media topics, I think it is the members who help us laugh and share our ability to be neighbors that makes me ( and I’m the owner) want to come in and see what is happening next.

Communication is such an amazing thing and lets face it without words and understanding their meanings, it is very difficult to make yourself understood ( with or without the Google translate box by your side.) and yet what I am finding is that while we are conversing on Adlandpro and elsewhere, the words that we are using are becoming very boring and stilted. The simple fact is that while new words are being added to dictionaries every year, we are also losing more words every year and I find that rather sad.

Even though my mother language is Polish, I find that some of the unusual English words have so much flavor and they are fun to use…so here is my thought for the day – how about we start resurrecting some awesome words and start using  these words more often?

Quote by C.S Lewis about awesome words

I have started a list with their meaning and though it may be a challenge to use these words, lets see if we can bring some of these words back to life. The English language can be amazing, if only we would start using the words that have been around for a very long time.

Moxie – Force of character, determination or nerve.

Snafu – A messy situation.

Scallywag – Someone who behaves badly but is still well-liked.

Befuddle – To make someone unable to think clearly.

Defenestrate – To throw something out of the window.

Hullabaloo – A commotion; a fuss.

Rigmarole – Something lengthy and complicated.

Absquatulate – To leave abruptly.

Stentorian – It’s a good word to describe someone’s extremely loud, booming voice.

Prolix – Having far too many words

Jobler – One who does small jobs

Serendipity – the act of making a fortunate but accidental discovery

Melange – a mixture

Fugacious – lasting a short time; fleeting

Bibliobibuli – one who reads too much

Flibbertigibbet – a chattering or flighty, light-headed person

Kyoodle – to make loud meaningless noise

Famigerate – to carry news from abroad

Gnathonize – to flatter

Icasm – figurative expression ( figure of speech)

Latibule – hiding place

Maleolent – having an “ill” bad odour

Privign – stepson

What awesome words would you add to this list?

 

 

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Author

Bogdan Fiedur is the Owner of Adlandpro classified advertising and a social network for people who are in affiliate marketing, small business and a social gathering. His main focus is on building Adlandpro into a world class venue for all people, creating and sharing quality content to help people, especially new people who are new to online marketing. Living in Winnipeg means enjoying sports such as ice fishing with a passion for Kayaking,enjoying the companionship of his dogs and a family man devoted to his wife and children.

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7 comments

    • very nice! I had a lot of fun doing this post, I saw words that were incredible in meaning. I wonder why they have gone to the wayside? Thanks Chuck for adding to the list.

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  • Pingback: Awesome Words We Need to Use More Often « Bogdan Fiedur

  • Have even more fun and look up the origin of these great words. For example: snafu, which first came to use during World War II. It is an acronym commonly used by GI’s to describe the current circumstances. Situation Normal All F****d Up!
    Another great word from that same era with similar origins, Fubar or F****d Up Beyond All Recognition.
    Our GI’s were a little rough around the edges… I think they still are and that’s not necessaroly a bad thing.
    I love words and wordplay.

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    • Hi David, I was thinking of a quote by Virginia Woolf “But words have been used too often; touched and turned, and left exposed to the dust of the street. The words we seek hang close to the tree. We come at dawn and find them sweet beneath the leaf.”
      It is understandable that as time passes and as we grow then one of the side effects is that words and phrases fall to the wayside.
      I find that sad though as some of these words had so much meaning to people. Even such phrases as “Gee Whiz” is never heard by people or how about “whippersnapper” “skedaddle” and so on.
      The words snafu while indeed had a slighty different meaning to the GI’s, it certainly was made respectable if one might say that by many people and yes could be used with equal frustration and forceful delivery lol

      I really would like to see words come back and the sad thing is if they dont’ then we lose an important piece of heritage

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    • Hi Steve and welcome to my blog. According to Wikipedia and I quote “Defenestration is the act of throwing someone or something out of a window. The term was coined around the time of an incident in Prague Castle in the year 1618. The word comes from the Latin de- (down or away from) and fenestra (window or opening). Likewise, it can also refer to the condition of being thrown out of a window, as in “The Defenestration of Ermintrude Inch”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defenestration.
      If there is another meaning then I welcome you to educate me as well as my readers as I would love to learn more. The English language is not an easy language to really understand :-)
      MY point to this article was to show people that there are many words that are getting lost and reviving or using all kinds of words is very important.

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